Adding Color and Opacity to Static Cling Window Graphics

Static Cling With Solid Color Vinyl - Fig1

The graphic in Fig.1 was produced by adding a 2mil cast green metallic vinyl to Mojave 8mil Hi-Stat film.

Here’s a simple idea to help you add color and opacity to static cling window graphics.

Static cling is only available from the manufacturers in clear and white. It’s designed primarily for window graphics where the goal is easy removal or repositioning with no adhesive residue. Static cling stickers are commonly used in automotive applications (think the Jiffy Lube reminder sticker) but are becoming more popular for commercial and residential window graphics.

We’ve been promoting Mojave Clear-Ad low tack adhesive window film, and we also offer Mojave 8 mil Hi-Stat static cling in white and clear. These are inkjet printable films that are ideal for digitally printed static cling decals.

But what do you do if you don’t have a large format printer? Just add vinyl. You can apply standard adhesive backed vinyl to static cling film to achieve an even wider range of color and opacity than that produced by a digital printer.  How does this work?

Wider Color Gamut

The color gamut of a vinyl on static cling graphic is broader simply because there are colors available from vinyl manufacturers that can’t be reproduced on a four color process printer. (For more on the difference between these color spaces, please check out our October 18th blog post about spot and process colors).  ORACAL’S #042 Lilac, for instance, is a tough color to match with a CMYK printer. But apply ORACAL 651 in Lilac over clear static cling would be a great idea for garden centers or residential springtime window decorations. In addition to exceeding the CMYK color gamut, metallic effects can be easily achieved by adding vinyl to static cling. The graphic in Fig.1 was produced by adding a 2mil cast green metallic vinyl to Mojave 8mil Hi-Stat film.

Better Opacity

The other advantage of vinyl on static cling is opacity. Clear static cling is of course designed to be transparent, but only in the negative space. The image imprinted on (or in this case adhering to) the cling film has shape and color. Printing a pastel color on clear static cling can be challenging. In our lilac example above, that would be hard to see if printed on a clear film. But putting lilac vinyl on static cling gives you exactly the color you want and the added opacity of the vinyl makes sure the color is consistent. So the next time your customer asks about a static cling window graphic, remember that you can probably exceed his or her expectations for removal and repositioning without settling for washed out graphics. Just add vinyl.