Tools for Combating the Sign Haters

United States Sign Council

In pretty much every community across the United States there are a handful of people who don’t like signs. They complain that they are unnecessary, a nuisance, gaudy, too big, cluttered, visual pollution, light pollution… the list goes on and on.

We know, however, that when signs are the proper design and size they can be used to communicate information safely to motorists traveling at high speeds, as well as alert pedestrians to local businesses. Signs on the premise of the business are its representation out of doors, relaying vital information about the business in a manner unparalleled by any other form of advertising. The low cost of signs, coupled with their effectiveness make them an excellent option for small businesses and they are the only form of advertising that can be acted upon instantly, right at the point of sale.

Many traditionalists prefer signs that are hand-crafted, non-illuminated, and low to the ground, which are perfectly suitable in certain circumstances. However, the technological advances of the 21st century have enabled us to do so much more with signs, and have also made a greater variety of signs necessary. Have you ever driven through a snowy city that has insisted on keeping its old, low street signs? Talk about irritating. The appropriate sign needed for the job must be allowed to be placed.

So how can your sign shop convince the community?

Your options are to put up with the complainers, address the problems yourself, or use the United States Sign Council‘s resources to provide the answer.

Members of the USSC are privy to eleven separate scientific studies that are specifically aimed at countering the anti-sign attitudes prevalent in so many communities today. They promote the proper sign size, height, and design of on-premise signs. The USSC is also full of other aids designed to address anti-sign attitudes. One example is the acceptance of the USSC Guideline Sign Code by the International Code Council, which is the source for the great majority of building codes in the States.

For more information on becoming a member of the USSC go to www.ussc.org. They have some of the most reasonable dues structure of any professional trade organization. United States Sign Council offices are located in Bristol, Pennsylvania.